How to Preserve Your Health Before, During, and After Pregnancy | CariFree

How to Preserve Your Health Before, During, and After Pregnancy

Good health and pregnancy are natural companions. Women work hard to achieve optimal health during pregnancy, both for themselves and for the baby with regular check ins with the doctor. It’s common to schedule a pre pregnancy health evaluation, a full schedule of prenatal visits, and postpartum evaluations. However, in the excitement of preparing for and welcoming new life, it’s possible to overlook a big piece of the whole health picture. When planning for D-day, don’t neglect your oral health. Paying attention to your oral health before during and after pregnancy is an important step for a healthy mom.

 

BEFORE

Planning for pregnancy should include planning for good oral health. It’s a great idea to schedule a checkup and cleaning with your dentist. A pre-pregnancy set of x-rays can help you evaluate tooth strength and check for any problems lurking on the horizon, especially considering the fact that most women prefer to avoid any form of x-rays during pregnancy. It’s a great time to make sure your teeth are healthy.

You can schedule any restorative work for this pre-pregnancy time if any is called for. It will be far more comfortable to have the work done without a pregnancy bump. And, if you have any concerns about anesthesia or prefer sedation dentistry for fillings, having the work done before baby will be much simpler and give no cause for alarm.

It’s also a good plan to check over your home care routine. Having healthy brushing and flossing habits well established before pregnancy will make it easier to keep those habits up during pregnancy.

 

DURING

Pregnancy can be a joyful time, but it can also demand a lot from your body. Some extra care for yourself is warranted now.

Don’t overlook regular dental visits in all the rushing around for prenatal visits.  A regular is cleaning is not only safe during pregnancy, it is better for the baby when you have a healthy oral environment. Gum disease is a risk factor for low birthweight and pre-term delivery. Should your dentist find signs of early gum disease, it’s important to treat it.

 

Sometimes, despite your best efforts, problems may arise during pregnancy that require treatment. It’s generally safer to treat problems during pregnancy than it is to let them grow unchecked. You and your dentist should carefully discuss the risks and benefits of treating problems or delaying treatment to decide what is best for your particular situation. The good news is that the American Dental Association and the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology agree that necessary dental x-rays and local anesthesia can be administered safely during pregnancy.

Baby’s developing bones require a lot of calcium and minerals. If mom’s diet is deficient in those, it’s possible that minerals will be borrowed from mom’s bones and teeth. A good quality oral care routine with fluoride and minerals like nano hydroxyapatite can help keep teeth in top shape and give the extra care that pregnancy can demand. Pregnancy is no time to slack off on your proper home care routine of brushing and flossing.

 

AFTER

The all consuming nature of caring for newborn can make it harder to remember your own care needs. Still, a little time for personal care in the postpartum period can made a big difference.

If you and your dentist have postponed care for a problem that developed during pregnancy, now is the time to schedule that care. If you are due for a regular cleaning, make time for it. You and the baby will be better off if you make time for good self-care.

 

Although it’s a classic joke that new moms can’t remember if they had time to brush their teeth, toothcare should not be a casualty of adjusting to a tiny new housemate. Maintain your good oral care routine maintains your good oral health and might just maintain your sanity. After all, a quick rinse with some freshening mouthwash might help make you feel a lot fresher after a long night of feedings.

 

 

Caring for your oral health before, during, and after your pregnancy is part of caring for your overall health, and an important part of your prenatal care.

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